CECUT Project

CECUT Project

   
  

 

Video of a participant putting on the headset and preparing to speak live, the video image of her face can be seen projected onto the facade of the CECUT Omnimax Theater building behind her play video 

The purpose was to use progressive technology to give voice and visibility to the women who work in the “maquiladora” industry in Tijuana. We designed a headset that integrated a camera and a microphone allowing the wearer to move while keeping the transmitted image in focus. The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence. These problems were shared live by the participants, in a public plaza on two consecutive nights, for an audience of more than 1,500. projections on the 60-foot diameter facade of the Omnimax Theater at the Centro Cultural Tijuana(CECUT)

The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence.

wodiczko.jpg

Artist Krzysztof Wodiczko‘s work with his MIT research group the Interrogative Design Group at MIT’sCenter for Visual Studies focuses  on the use of media and technology to present and elevate awareness of social and cultural conditions.  His projections on buildings often draw out and visualize the political backdrop of architecture. Check out the amazing projection on what looks like a small version ofBoullée’s design for a Cenotaph for Newton.

“The purpose was to use progressive technology to give voice and visibility to the women who work in the “maquiladora” industry in Tijuana. We designed a headset that integrated a camera and a microphone allowing the wearer to move while keeping the transmitted image in focus. The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence. These problems were shared live by the participants, in a public plaza on two consecutive nights, for an audience of more than 1,500. projections on the 60-foot diameter facade of the Omnimax Theater at the Centro Cultural Tijuana.”

 

Intensive Topologies – Krzystof Wodiczko’s “The Tijuana Projection” (2001)

[12] Krzystof Wodiczko is an internationally known artist who has been working with slide and video projections since the 1980s. Emigrating from Poland to Canada and then the United States, Wodiczko currently teaches in Boston at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has had several major retrospectives of his work. Wodiczko’s over seventy public projections in locations like Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square, London (1985), the Hirshhorn Museum (1988), the A-bomb Dome in Hiroshima (1998), Beijing’s Tiananmen Square (1999), and more recently the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri (2004) depict marginalized persons or contain symbols that recall the violent history of a given landmark.

[13] An example of this recollection is the Madrid projection on the triumphal arch (1991). The skeleton hands that are holding a gas nozzle and M-16 were Wodiczko’s response to the first Gulf war. The triumphal arch was built in celebration of General Francisco Franco’s victory in the Spanish Civil War. At the top of the arch is the question, “¿Cuantos?,” or, ‘how much?’ The projection integrated temporarily into the site traces a potential lineage from European forms of fascism to American neo-colonialism, confronting the contemporary moment with a history of violence enshrined through the monument. Similar to Der Digitale Blick, the projected image along with the experience of the artwork brings the site to life. Wodiczko explains that “the speaker becomes a critical participant in the environment of the monument. The person begins to animate the monument. Another kind of dialogue begins for the city at large, perhaps for the world” (Philips 2003, 4).

[14] The animation to which Wodiczko refers gains a new significance in his Tijuana projection (2001). Part of the art project InSITE 2000, the Tijuana projection wants to give voices to the marginalized women of Mexico working in “maquiladora” factories that live through the traumas of sexual abuse, alcoholism, and domestic violence. Located primarily along the American border, these factories import tariff-free materials from the United States, assemble the products, and send them back to the U.S. Proliferating after the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), maquiladoras are a way to lower corporate costs for American consumers. The women working in these factories encounter sexism, low wages, discrimination and the environmental effects from manufacturing toxins and other chemicals released in the air. The Tijuana projection gives a face and voice to free trade and to the Mexican worker increasingly derided in the United States with the current debate over immigration policy spurred on primarily by neo-conservatives.

 

http://www.rhizomes.net/issue17/wright/index.html

 

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