Listening Post by BEN RUBIN

Listening Post
by BEN RUBIN on SEPTEMBER 29, 2010
in ART,PROJECTS,SOUND

Listening Post is an art installation by Mark Hansen and Ben Rubin that culls text fragments in real time from thousands of unrestricted Internet chat rooms, bulletin boards and other public forums. The texts are read (or sung) by a voice synthesizer, and simultaneously displayed across a suspended grid of more than two hundred small electronic screens.

Listening Post cycles through a series of six movements, each a different arrangement of visual, aural, and musical elements, each with it’s own data processing logic.

Dissociating the communication from its conventional on-screen presence, Listening Post is a visual and sonic response to the content, magnitude, and immediacy of virtual communication.

Listening Post can be seen at The London Science Musuem and The San Jose Museum of Art, San Jose, Calif.

Photos of Listening Post on Flickr

Video of Listening Post on Vimeo

Listening Post: “I am” from Ben Rubin on Vimeo.

Listening Post by BEN RUBIN에 댓글 닫힘 게시됨: Interactions

CONVERSATION TABLE by chris csikszentmihalyi

 

This project is reflection on a type of social dynamics that takes place at tables during conversations. Who dominates the conversation?

Two people, seated at each end of the table, converse. As they converse, light emitting diodes (LEDs), embedded along the center of the table, are activated by their pattern of conversation. Two microphones pick up the duration and the volume of the conversation at regular intervals, and trigger light animation from the end where one speaks toward the other. If both people speak simultaneously, the lights start animating from both ends.

The table doesn’t parse nor “understand” the nature of the discourse, rather it isolates and brings forward one specific component of interaction at tables.

   

 

The table is made of ½ inch honeycomb cardboard and is completely dry mount (no adhesive is used). All joints and connections are fastened with metal corner braces (purchased at Home Depot), washers and screws. The electronics consist of micro-controller, two microphones with amplifiers and bandpass filters, and 12 ultra-bright LEDs.


 

 

http://web.mit.edu/lira/www/projects/convtable.htm

Bodymover, Hannover, Expo 2000

Created for the interface exhibition at the expo 2000 in Hanover, Bodymover is an interactive multi-user installation utilising the whole body of the visitor as an interface.  The players could interact with each other and a range of sound-objects on a 20 x 5 meter area.

The camera system detects the presence of the visitor, and shows it in the form of a digital aura surrounding the person on the floor. The players can manipulate this glowing halo by movement. For instance, extending a leg or a hand to one direction deforms the aura and shoots out a stream of particles. If the particles then hit any of the sound objects positioned on the floor, they create different sounds, dependent on the speed and direction. In this collaborative experience, the participants compose their audio visual environment in a playful way.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Interactive Tippdrive Cell Phone Game

ART+COM produced the interactive TippDrive mobile phone game for the DaimlerChrysler Bank stand at the IAA Fair in Frankfurt in 2003. This multi-player game has all DaimlerChrysler Bank‘s products lining up on the grid and competing against each other in a car race. The player who is quickest at assimilating the product descriptions and brand messages and responding to them has the edge over the other players.

􀁺 The game is projected onto a 2 x 2 metre square Cube wall. Up to six players can compete by dialling a toll-free number on their cell phones. To progress participants must press the appropriate buttons on their phones to give instructions corresponding to the desired products from the DaimlerChrysler portfolio. In so doing they steer their own racing car along the track.

􀁺 TippDrive is a race. First over the finishing line wins. On top of his victory the winner also gets the chance to crack the virtual reality jackpot by tapping a code into his phone. The race has voiceover commentary and features interactive Formula One sound effects.

 

http://dcc.ndhu.edu.tw/itv/New/lecture/ppt/940521-1.pdf