The Letter Writing Project

Lee Mingwei – The Letter Writing Project (Kneeling Booth)

The exhibition Mind Space focuses on ‘mind’ as the junction between the spirit and the body, rationality and emotionality. Mind is a space of inner experience, situated in the midpoint between matter and spirit and embracing both body and soul, and is also something we must always examine and cultivate. To awaken mind is yet one more crucial role contemporary art must not sacrifice, and especially today, when all of our senses are wired like conduits to the outside world, to claim an inwardly-oriented perspective is absolutely necessary in order to attain a sense of unity and balance.

 

 Statement

When my maternal grandmother passed way, I still had many things to say to her but it was too late.  For the next year and a half I wrote many letters to her, as if she were still alive, in order to share my thoughts and feelings with her.

For The Letter-Writing Project, I invited visitors to write the letters they had always meant to but never taken time for.  Each of three writing booths, constructed of wood and translucent glass, contained a desk and writing materials.  Visitors could enter one of the three booths and write a letter to a deceased or otherwise absent loved one, offering previously unexpressed gratitude, forgiveness or apology.  They could then seal and address their letters (for posting by the museum) or leave them unsealed in one of the slots on the wall of the booth, where later visitors could read them.  Many later visitors come to realize, through reading the letters of others that they too carried unexpressed feelings that they would feel relieved to write down and perhaps share.  In this way, a chain of feeling was created, reminding visitors of the larger world of emotions in which we all participate.  In the end, it was the spirit of the writer that was comforted, whether the letter was ever read by the intended recipient or others.

(Commisioned by Whitney Museum of American Art, 1998)

 

http://www.leemingwei.com/projects.php

 

‘마인드 스페이스’전

 

물질만능 시대에 살고 있는 현대인들에게 삶과 죽음, 사람 사이의 관계, 마음의 평안 등 내면 성찰의 기회를 제공하는 ‘마인드 스페이스(mind space)’전이 호암갤러리에서 열리고 있다.

제목에서도 알 수 있듯 이번 전시는 현대미술에서 소외된 정신의 문제, 다시 말해 정신과 육체, 이성과 감성의 조화를 꾀하고자 ‘마음’에 초점을 맞추고 있다.

 

 

 

 

 

 

리 밍웨이(Lee Mingwei)의 '편지쓰기 프로젝트'

 

미국 추상표현주의의 대가이자 숭고함의 감정을 고양시키는 색면회화로 유명한 마크 로스코, 빛과 공간을 이용해 관람객을 묵상의 세계로 인도하는 제임스 터렐을 비롯해 세계 주요 비엔날레에서 주목받고 있는 라니 마에스트로, 리 밍웨이 등 국내외 작가 8인이 회화, 비디오, 설치, 조각 등 다양한 장르의 작품 15점을 선보인다.
부드러운 빛이 스며드는 반투명 유리벽으로 만들어진 방안에서 친구나 가족, 또는 자신에게 편지를 쓰는 리 밍웨이의 ‘편지쓰기 프로젝트(The Letter Writing Prject)’, 희미한 전등 아래 밀랍으로 만들어진 벽 사이의 좁은 복도를 지나가도록 만들어져 있는 볼프강 라이프의 ‘밀납으로 만든 방(Beeswax Chamber)’등 작품 하나 하나가 관람객의 참여를 유도하고 있는 것도 이번 전시의 특징이다.
‘빛과 무한의 공간’ ‘생성과 소멸의 공간’ ‘기억과 치유의 공간’ 속에서 자기 내면으로 떠나는 색다른 여행을 경험할 수 있을 것이다.

 

 

Advertisements

Interactive dressing rooms

Rem Koolhaas & IDEO – Interactive dressing rooms

In December 2001 the Italian haute couturier Prada opened its groundbreaking new “epicenter” store in New York City, designed by the Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas. IDEO, working with Koolhaas and his architecture and research firm OMA/AMO, created the invisible technology that allows Prada staff members to choreograph the in-store sales experience.

IDEO’s recent projects include hi-tech fitting rooms in the New York Prada epicentre, designed with Rem Koolhaas. Each dressing room is a simple booth with Privalite glass walls that switch from transparent to opaque for privacy

The interactive dressing rooms augment the experience of trying on clothes for the customer and enhances the relationship between the sales assistant and the customer. It is presented as a simple eight-foot-square glass booth. One wall forms the door, which the customer can make opaque for privacy during changing or clear to show off a garment to someone outside the booth. Another wall incorporates a “magic mirror,” a camera and display that adds a four-second delay so the customer can spin around and view all sides of the garment. The opposite wall has two interactive closets, one for hanging clothes and one with shelves. Sensors in the closets detect the electronic tags on store items and trigger a touch screen that displays the item and its related information, from availability to permutations of color, fabric, and size

IDEO’s recent projects include hi-tech fitting rooms in the New York Prada epicentre, designed with Rem Koolhaas. Each dressing room is a simple booth with Privalite glass walls that switch from transparent to opaque for privacy

Atelier Markgraph–designed showroom in Darmstadt

T-Online leaps into the future at an Atelier Markgraph–designed showroom in Darmstadt, Germany

Even in this virtual age, you can’t wrap your hand around the Internet. Which makes it a challenging product for a showroom. When Germany’s Internet service provider T-Online required a branded space to cater to partnership enterprises and investors, Atelier Markgraph presented a futuristic plan that actually managed to pin down the intangible.

A platform for the Web-based tools of today and tomorrow—DSL, photo developing, travel services—the T-Online Experience Center is a technological playground driven by interactive activities and the sense of discovery that they impart. “We entertain and educate at the same time, without giving people a headache,” principal Lars Uwe Bleher says.

Carved out of the ground floor of T-Online’s headquarters in the small city of Darmstadt, the showroom is divided in two—but not by choice. A fire wall splits the 3,300-square-foot space uncompromisingly in halves, and each half is further obstructed by a central structural column. Worse yet, the doorway in the fire wall is a narrow 4 feet, just wide enough for wheelchair regulations.

Bleher’s solution, a two-part journey, begins in what seems to be a standard corporate welcome area—until the floor starts moving beneath your feet. (You may have been so focused on the glowing constellation of ovals and circles cut out of the ceiling that you didn’t notice the large turntable set into the plum-colored carpet.) When the floor kicks into gear, the lights dim and a movie on T-Online rolls onto a white wall. The projector is built into a drywall partition standing in the center of the carpeted turntable, so the movie begins on that first wall and finishes, 180 degrees later, on the fire wall.

Another 30 degrees, and you’re dropped off at a 3-D version of the T-Online home page, a transition space where images of nodes and lines dance across translucent white polyester banners, and gelled incandescents bathe everything in magenta, the corporate color. The installation guides you through the gap in the fire wall and deposits you in the interactive Future Zone.

“That’s when you get to explore,” Bleher says. In the center of the moodier showroom, its walls plum and its ceiling black, stands a white linoleum-clad spatial inlay. It’s essentially a platform punctuated at the center by the inevitable structural column and at the edges by three vertically cantilevered integral canopies, one above each of three hands-on vignettes: Home, Home Office, and On the Road.

In the latter, which promotes T-Online’s travel capabilities, panoramic images of Antarctica, Rio de Janeiro, and other exotic locations drift across a 6-by-15-foot screen. You direct the images via user interfaces conceived as a field of giant flowers—white molded-polycarbonate disks mounted on flexible steel stems 4 feet high. To activate an interface, you have to lean on it. “We went immersive, involving the whole body,” Bleher explains.

A jaunt across the linoleum leads to Home Office, where a table of stained oak serves as a screen for overhead projections of everyday objects: a bank statement, a map of Berlin, a meal. Touch the food on the virtual plate, and the recipe pops up. Touch again, and the recipe connects to a wine suggestion.

In the Home vignette, Bleher paired leather-covered seating in beige and brown with a shag rug in ecru and a UFO of a white pendant fixture. Attached to the cantilevered focal wall, a screen displays a bubbling aquarium for “summer” or a flickering fireplace for “winter,” interchanged simply by pressing a button.

A horizon line of informative “thoughts” is Velcro’d to the dark purple walls outside the three vignettes. The blurbs pose and answer Internet trivia questions such as “What is a googol?” (The number 10 raised to the power 100.) Or “Who came up with the first Web cam?” (Students at the University of Cambridge.) How much fun is the T-Online showroom? Lots.

 

http://www.interiordesign.net/article/480809-Cyber_Space_pix.php

 

Cultivation Kitchen by INAX

 

[Figure 1] Foam Bath

[Figure 2] Cultivation Kitchen

In regards to bathing, we focused on elderly people who live alone. Japanese baths, which use large amounts of water even for a single person, may become outmoded in the coming age. The “Foam Bath” that we conceived provides the user with a warm bath by immersing them in foam bubbles, and uses only 1/20 the amount of water used in present-day bathing.

http://www.sd.polyu.edu.hk/iasdr/proceeding/papers/Expanded%20Evaluation%20System%20for%20Design%20Guidelines.pdf

Wonderful Happiness Insurance

Wonderful Happiness Insurance

장지아 설치·영상展 2002_0406 ▶ 2002_0430


장지아
 ● 작가 장지아는 1973년에 태어나 2001년 이후 『What’s the Matter?』등을 주제로 3회의 개인전을 열었으며, 「국제전자음악제」 「Beyond Origin」 「인디비디오 페스티발」 「불온한 경계」 「Micro Movie Festival」 「서울 독립영화제」 등 다수의 단체/기획전을 통해 영상과 설치미술을 오가며 사회의 제도들이 자아내는 갖가지 상황들을 젊고 날카로운 시선으로 투영해내는 작업을 펼쳐왔다. ● 『일렉트릭 파워』전에서 장지아는 관람자가 밟는 자전거 페달에 의해 얻게되는 동력으로 작동하는 작품을 선보인다. 관람자의 힘이 가해지면 전광판에 조명이 켜지고 작품이 완성되는 것이다. 단순히 센서에 의해 움직이는 작품에 비해 관람객과의 소통을 적극적으로 이끌어내는 이 작품은 개인과 개인의 노력이 모여 만들어낼 수 있는 꿈과 미래사회에 대한 희망에 대해 이야기하고 있다. ■

‘원더풀 행복 보험’은 2002년 4월 일주아트하우스에서 있었던 장지아의 두 번째 개인전 제목이며44 당시 출품했던 작품의 제목이기도 하다. 보험 회사라는 특수한 장소에 위치한 전시공간의 상징성을 은유적으로 비틀어 개념화한 이 전시에서 장지아는 현대 사회에서 요구되는 자본의 가치와 일상의 양면성을 유머러스한 방식으로 풍자해냈다. 더 많이 불행할수록 더 많은 보상을 받게 되는 보험의 규칙이 만들어 내는 이 역설적인 인과관계는 미래의 안정된 삶을 보장한다는 ‘보험’이라는 제도-나아가 다양한 분야의 사회 제도-가 보여주는 허위성을 보여준다. 자전거 페달을 세게 밟아 더 많은 고통을 동반할수록 더 많은 상금을 받게 되는 게임 형식의 이 작품은 과대망상적 희망과 과장된 밝음으로 인해 우리 삶에 강요되고 있는 또 하나의 이데올로기 -신용카드 광고에서나 찾아볼 수 있는 완벽하게 아름답고 잘 가꾸어진 행복한 삶-를 보여준다.

제도와 시스템의 허구를 파헤치기 위해 현실의 이중성을 집요하게 파고든다는 점에서 그의 작업은 지극히 전략적이다. 이 점은 그가 주로 사용하는 매체-비디오와도 관련이 깊다. 현실과 시·지각의 경험이 일치함으로써 새로운 감성보다는 기존의 헤게모니에 좌우되는 비디오 매체의 현실 밀착적인 특성상44 비디오 아트는 회화나 조각 등 전통적인 예술과 달리 현실에 바탕을 둔 강력한 발언을 염두에 둔다. 장지아는 이 같은 비디오 아트의 현실성을 이용해 그 안으로 적극적으로 들어가44 익숙한 그 곳에 매우 낯선 풍경을 만들어 낸다.

 

 

CECUT Project

CECUT Project

   
  

 

Video of a participant putting on the headset and preparing to speak live, the video image of her face can be seen projected onto the facade of the CECUT Omnimax Theater building behind her play video 

The purpose was to use progressive technology to give voice and visibility to the women who work in the “maquiladora” industry in Tijuana. We designed a headset that integrated a camera and a microphone allowing the wearer to move while keeping the transmitted image in focus. The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence. These problems were shared live by the participants, in a public plaza on two consecutive nights, for an audience of more than 1,500. projections on the 60-foot diameter facade of the Omnimax Theater at the Centro Cultural Tijuana(CECUT)

The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence.

wodiczko.jpg

Artist Krzysztof Wodiczko‘s work with his MIT research group the Interrogative Design Group at MIT’sCenter for Visual Studies focuses  on the use of media and technology to present and elevate awareness of social and cultural conditions.  His projections on buildings often draw out and visualize the political backdrop of architecture. Check out the amazing projection on what looks like a small version ofBoullée’s design for a Cenotaph for Newton.

“The purpose was to use progressive technology to give voice and visibility to the women who work in the “maquiladora” industry in Tijuana. We designed a headset that integrated a camera and a microphone allowing the wearer to move while keeping the transmitted image in focus. The headset was connected to two projectors and loudspeakers that transmitted the testimonies live. The women’s testimonies focused on a variety of issues including work related abuse, sexual abuse, family disintegration, alcoholism, and domestic violence. These problems were shared live by the participants, in a public plaza on two consecutive nights, for an audience of more than 1,500. projections on the 60-foot diameter facade of the Omnimax Theater at the Centro Cultural Tijuana.”

 

Intensive Topologies – Krzystof Wodiczko’s “The Tijuana Projection” (2001)

[12] Krzystof Wodiczko is an internationally known artist who has been working with slide and video projections since the 1980s. Emigrating from Poland to Canada and then the United States, Wodiczko currently teaches in Boston at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and has had several major retrospectives of his work. Wodiczko’s over seventy public projections in locations like Nelson’s Column in Trafalgar Square, London (1985), the Hirshhorn Museum (1988), the A-bomb Dome in Hiroshima (1998), Beijing’s Tiananmen Square (1999), and more recently the Old Courthouse in St. Louis, Missouri (2004) depict marginalized persons or contain symbols that recall the violent history of a given landmark.

[13] An example of this recollection is the Madrid projection on the triumphal arch (1991). The skeleton hands that are holding a gas nozzle and M-16 were Wodiczko’s response to the first Gulf war. The triumphal arch was built in celebration of General Francisco Franco’s victory in the Spanish Civil War. At the top of the arch is the question, “¿Cuantos?,” or, ‘how much?’ The projection integrated temporarily into the site traces a potential lineage from European forms of fascism to American neo-colonialism, confronting the contemporary moment with a history of violence enshrined through the monument. Similar to Der Digitale Blick, the projected image along with the experience of the artwork brings the site to life. Wodiczko explains that “the speaker becomes a critical participant in the environment of the monument. The person begins to animate the monument. Another kind of dialogue begins for the city at large, perhaps for the world” (Philips 2003, 4).

[14] The animation to which Wodiczko refers gains a new significance in his Tijuana projection (2001). Part of the art project InSITE 2000, the Tijuana projection wants to give voices to the marginalized women of Mexico working in “maquiladora” factories that live through the traumas of sexual abuse, alcoholism, and domestic violence. Located primarily along the American border, these factories import tariff-free materials from the United States, assemble the products, and send them back to the U.S. Proliferating after the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), maquiladoras are a way to lower corporate costs for American consumers. The women working in these factories encounter sexism, low wages, discrimination and the environmental effects from manufacturing toxins and other chemicals released in the air. The Tijuana projection gives a face and voice to free trade and to the Mexican worker increasingly derided in the United States with the current debate over immigration policy spurred on primarily by neo-conservatives.

 

http://www.rhizomes.net/issue17/wright/index.html